Programs give a glimpse into wild and endangered species.

TV programs take us to the places we long to visit. They capture sights and sounds and emotions that can elude even the most experienced traveler;  A young tiger exiting its den for the first time, the fatigue of a hunting cheetah’s lanky limbs and lions roaring at sunset.

cc

Besides zoos and wildlife preserves, these programs are often our only glimpses to endangered species. A fortunate few live in their midst; the insightful offer funding for excursions while the passionate long with literature, tv and film.  Another place to experience while helping protect wild and endangered species is Preservation Station and the T.I.G.E.R.S.Wild Encounter Tour near Myrtle Beach.  Here you will have a look at some of the most magnificent creatures on Earth up close and uncaged AND you can see and photograph the animals climbing and jumping and doing all the natural activities they would normally do in the wild.
 
As for TV, endangered and exotic species can come to life where people can enjoy Discovery, Animal Planet and Nat Geo Wild programs. One of this year’s best is The Secret Life of Elephants. 

The Secret Life of Elephants is a BBC nature documentary series following the lives of elephants and the work of the conservation charity Save the Elephants in Samburu National Reserve, Kenya. It was first transmitted in the UK on BBC One in January 2009 to 4.2 million viewers and The Secret Life of Elephants is a BBC nature documentary series following the lives of elephants and the work of the conservation charity Save the Elephants in Samburu National Reserve, Kenya. It was first transmitted in the UK on BBC One in January 2009 to 4.2 million viewers and stands to earn an Emmy for Outstanding Nature Programming.

The three part series follows the lives of African elephants in Samburu, Northern Kenya, focusing on the stories of individual elephants to show the most dramatic moments of their lives. Their hidden world is revealed, from the complexities of family life and their intelligence to the depth of their emotions. The series also follows the work of father and daughter Iain and Saba Douglas-Hamilton and their Save the Elephants team, which includes tracking elephants, fitting tracking collars and developing the relationship between humans and elephants. Footage captures a herd of elephants encountering a dead, unfamiliar carcass. They encircle it; inhale its putrid scent, before kicking up heaps of dirt in a makeshift burial. More powerful than its prehistoric frame and regal trumpeted call is the elephant’s propensity for emotion, accompanied by long-lasting memories.

bb

These traits make elephants uniquely vulnerable to suffering trauma. The offspring of poached elephants often require special attention, which is precisely what Nairobi’s David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust provides. Orphaned baby elephants are not merely given shelter and food: human guardians also provide comfort to motherless elephants around the clock. Caretakers sleep on raised cots above slumbering orphans, periodically waking throughout the night to bottle-feed.

Elephants’ advanced emotional capabilities also make them more dangerous. Neglected orphans — if they manage to survive in the wild — sometimes exhibit aggressive behavior. In one wildlife preserve, elephants began killing rhinos without explanation. After a thorough investigation, the preserve staff discovered that the violent elephants were orphans who had witnessed the death of a parent.

Save the Elephants knows that conservation does more than guarantee the continuation of elephant species. African elephants, the largest land mammal, are considered keystone species: they play an integral role in maintaining savannah and forest ecosystems.  Though it’s not raging on our home turf, we must all join in this fight to save our planet’s endangered species. With programs like Planet Earth, Life, and The Secret Life of Elephants beaming from our computers and tv screens, physical distance is no longer an excuse. 

tt

Go online and visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, Preservation Station and the T.I.G.E.R.S. tour.  Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: