T.I.G.E.R.S. – Wildlife ambassadors

Good day and Happy New Year from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  It's 2014 and the Wild Encounters tour begins March 16!  

T.I.G.E.R.S. was created as a wildlife education organization, dedicated to promoting global conservation with informative, educational, and entertaining interactive programs. Director Bhagavan Antle works closely with international wildlife conservation projects in South America, Africa and Thailand. In addition to providing much needed funds for these programs, our personnel have been involved in field research as well.

Doc Antle is widely recognized as one of the foremost animal trainers in the world, having worked with thousands of animals. He travels the globe promoting the education and conservation of some of our planet's most rare and endangered species. Among these is, of course, the white tiger.

Most people do not realize that we are in the midst of a mass extinction that is affecting every living thing on this planet. We are losing up to a dozen species of plant and animal every day. This rate is far faster than when the dinosaurs died out 65 million years ago. A stunningly beautiful animal like a tiger captures people's attention so they become more willing to learn about critical conservation issues. Tigers are an important living example of the environmental problems facing the world, which makes them the perfect wildlife ambassadors. Wild tigers are currently on the brink of extinction. Due to rampant habitat destruction and poaching we may be losing a tiger a day.

The unique colors of certain tigers attract an even greater amount of public attention. Therefore, Royal white and golden tabby tigers assume a more important role as ambassadors for conservation issues. Doc Antle and the staff of T.I.G.E.R.S. has found that after an up-close, uncaged experience with these tigers, people are willing to learn about the increasing global issues and possible solutions to save our planet's biodiversity.
 


Many tiger conservation programs have focused their funding on the five remaining subspecies of tigers: Siberian, Indochinese, South Chinese, Sumatran, and Bengal. However, recent genetic evidence suggests that there are only two truly unique subspecies or types of tigers, Sumatran and Bengal. This should allow for a more unified conservation effort for tigers by eliminating the thinking that created a division in which conservation programs were more about National borders than about the Big Cats themselves.
 


Dr. Antle having has also worked with The RSF (Rare Species Fund) and thousands of animals and even in Hollywood on such films as Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls and Forrest Gump.  He has also contributed to Matabeleland Leopard and Cheetah project in Zimbabwe, the Savannah Cheetah Foundation in South Africa and Samutprakam Wildlife Park in Thailand.

If you want to join Doc Antle and T.I.G.E.R.S. in conservation, visit the website for more information on how you can help.
 


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